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Family Healthcare

Child Health 0 - 6 Years

Children’s Health

There is a good guide on the NHS website which describes various conditions affecting children. There is advice on how to diagnose them, how to treat them and if further advice should be consulted.

> NHS childhood illness slideshow

When Should I Worry?

Having an ill child can be a very scary experience for parents. If you understand more about the illness it can help you to feel more in control. This booklet is for parents (and older children) and deals with common infections in children who are normally healthy.

> Download the booklet

NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments

See the > NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments browser for an in-depth description of many common health issues

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Child Health 7 - 15 Years

Children’s Health

There is a good guide on the NHS website which describes various conditions affecting children. There is advice on how to diagnose them, how to treat them and if further advice should be consulted.

> NHS childhood illness slideshow

When Should I Worry?

Having an ill child can be a very scary experience for parents. If you understand more about the illness it can help you to feel more in control. This booklet is for parents (and older children) and deals with common infections in children who are normally healthy.

> Download the booklet

NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments

See the > NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments browser for an in-depth description of many common health issues

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Mens Health

Mens’ Health

Five health symptoms men should not ignore:

“British men are paying the price for neglecting their health: more than 100,000 men a year die prematurely.

On average, men go to their GP half as often as women. It’s important to be aware of changes to your health, and to see your GP immediately if you notice something that’s not right.”
> Find out more

Prostate Cancer

Each year about 36,000 men in the UK are diagnosed with prostate cancer, making it the most common cancer in men. It mainly affects men aged over 50.

  • difficulty in starting to pass urine
  • a weak, sometimes intermittent flow of urine
  • dribbling of urine before and after urinating
  • a frequent or urgent need to pass urine
  • rarely, blood in your urine or semen and pain when passing urine

These symptoms aren’t always caused by prostate cancer but if you have them, see your GP.

Find out more about the symptoms, causes and diagnosis of prostate cancer by using the resources below.

Resources

> BUPA – Prostate Cancer
> NHS Choices – Prostate Cancer

Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer, though the most common cancer in young men, it is still quite rare. With 2000 new cases being diagnosed each year, this makes it the biggest cause of cancer related death in 15 – 35-year-old males. It accounts for around 70 deaths a year within the UK alone.

What to Look Out For

The most common symptom of testicular cancer is swelling or a pea-sized lump in one of the testes (balls). There is no current screening test therefore it is important that you look out for the following signs and symptoms.

  • A dull ache, or sharp pain, in your testicles, or scrotum, which may come and go
  • A feeling of heaviness in your scrotum
  • A dull ache in your lower abdomen
  • A sudden collection of fluid in your scrotum
  • Fatigue, and generally feeling unwell.
Resources

> NHS – Information on Testicular Cancer
> BUPA – Testicular Cancer

Sexual Problems

It’s estimated that one man in 10 has a problem related to having sex, such as premature ejaculation or erectile dysfunction. Dr John Tomlinson of The Sexual Advice Association explains some of the causes, and where to seek help.

> Find our more on NHS Choices

NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments

See the > NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments browser for an in-depth description of many common health issues

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Women's Health

Cervical Screening (Smear Tests)

Cervical screening is a method of preventing cervical cancer by detecting abnormal cells in the cervix (lower part of the womb). Cervical screening is not a test for cancer, but it is a test to check the health of the cervix.

Most women’s test results show that everything is normal. But for one in 20 women, the test will show some changes in the cells of the cervix. Most of these changes will not lead to cervical cancer and the cells will go back to normal on their own. In some cases, the abnormal cells need to be treated to prevent them becoming a problem later.

> NHS Choices – Cervical Screening
The why, when & how guide to cervical screening

> NHS Inform (Scottish Patients)
Cervical Screening information, risks, benefits and tests for patients based in Scotland

> Cervical Screening
This factsheet is for women who would like information about having a cervical smear test for screening. This means having the test when you don’t have any symptoms.

HPV Vaccination

Since September 2008 there has been a national programme to vaccinate girls aged 12-13 against human papilloma virus (HPV). There is also a three-year catch up campaign that will offer the HPV vaccine (also known as the cervical cancer jab) to 13-18 year old girls.

The programme is delivered largely through secondary schools, and consists of three injections that are given over a six-month period. In the UK, more than 1.4 million doses have been given since the vaccination programme started.

What is Human papilloma virus (HPV)?

Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the name of a family of viruses that affect the skin and the moist membranes that line your body, such as those in your cervix, anus, mouth and throat. These membranes are called the mucosa.

There are more than 100 different types of HPV viruses, with about 40 types affecting the genital area. These are classed as high risk and low risk.

How do you get HPV?

Types of HPV that affect the skin can be passed on by skin contact with an affected person. The types of HPV that affect the mouth and throat can be passed on through kissing. Genital HPV is usually spread through intimate, skin to skin, contact during sex. You can have the genital HPV virus for years and not have any sign of it.

How HPV can cause cervical cancer?

Most HPV infections are harmless or cause genital warts, however some types can cause cervical cancer. Most HPV infections clear up by themselves, but in some people the infection can last a long time. HPV infects the cells of the surface of the cervix where it can stay for many years without you knowing.

The HPV virus can damage these cells leading to changes in their appearance. Over time, these changes can develop into cervical cancer. The purpose of cervical screening (testing) is to detect these changes, which, if picked up early enough, can be treated to prevent cancer happening. If they are left untreated, cancer can develop and may lead to serious illness and death.

> Cancer Research UK
HPV Facts and information

> NHS Choices – HPV Vaccination
Why, how and when is the vaccination given and what are the side effects

> HPV Vaccine
This factsheet is for people who would like information about the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine.

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK. About 46,000 women get breast cancer in the UK each year. Most of them (8 out of 10) are over 50, but younger women, and in rare cases men, can also get breast cancer.

The NHS Breast Screening Programme invites over 2 million women for screening every year, and detects over 14,000 cancers. Dr Emma Pennery of Breast Cancer Care says: “Breast X-rays, called mammograms, can detect tumours at a very early stage, before you’d feel a lump. The earlier it’s treated, the higher the survival rate.”

Find out more about breast cancer screening

> Macmillan Cancer Research
The causes and symptoms of breast cancer in women and explains how it is diagnosed and treated

> NHS Choices
Symtpoms, diagnosis, treatment, prevention & screening information

NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments

See the > NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments browser for an in-depth description of many common health issues

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Senior's Health

Seasonal Flu Vaccination

Influenza – flu – is a highly infectious and potentially serious illness caused by influenza viruses. Each year the make-up of the seasonal flu vaccine is designed to protect against the influenza viruses that the World Health Organization decide are most likely to be circulating in the coming winter.

Regular immunisation (vaccination) is given free of charge to the following at-risk people, to protect them from seasonal flu:

    • people aged 65 or over,
    • people with a serious medical condition
    • if you are pregnant
    • people living in a residential or nursing home
    • the main carers for an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer becomes ill
    • healthcare or social care professionals directly involved in patient care

For more information on flu immunisation, including background information on the vaccine and how you can get the jab, see Seasonal flu jab

> HPA – Season Flu Guide

> Seasonal Flu Factsheet

Eating Well & Exercise – helping you maintain a healthy body

We’re bombarded with scare stories about weight, from size zero to the obesity ‘epidemic’. But a healthy body is determined by different factors for each of us.

> NHS – Good Food Guide
Information on a healthy diet and ways to make it work for you

> NHS – Why be active?
Even a little bit of exercise will make you feel better about yourself, boost your confidence and cut your risk of developing a serious illness.

NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments

See the NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments browser for an in-depth description of many common health issues

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Sexual Health

Both men and women need to look after their sexual health and take time to understand the issues that surround contraception and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

For instance there are some STIs, like chlamydia, that you could be carrying without having any symptoms. This infection can affect fertility, so it’s important to make use of the sexual health services available for free on the NHS.

Useful Resources:

> Sex & Young People
A comprehensive guide to the questions you may have about sex from the NHS

> Sexually Transmitted Infections
Issues, symptoms and treatments

> Sexual Health FAQs
Expert answers from a qualified Doctor

Here you’ll find tips for a fulfilling sex life plus advice on STDs, contraception and common sex problems.

> FPA – The Sexual Health Charity
Sexual health advice and information on contraception, sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy choices, abortion and planning a pregnancy.

Contraception

There are so many different types of contraception available that you should be able to find the right method. You may have to try several different things before you choose the one you like most.

Useful Resources

> NetDoctor
A Family Planning specialist writes about the different types of contraception, the benefits and pitfalls and how effective they are

> Contraception – NHS Choices
Information on Contraception from NHS Choices including why, when and how it should be used and with links to other useful resources.

> Hormonal Contraception
This factsheet is for women who are taking hormonal contraceptives, or who would like information about them.

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection among under-25s. Often there are no symptoms, but testing and treatment are simple.

Causes and risk factors Chlamydia is usually passed from one person to another during vaginal, oral or anal sex, or by sharing sex toys. It can live inside cells of the cervix, urethra, rectum and sometimes in the throat and eyes.

Useful Links

> NHS Choices – focus on Chlamydia
Information, videos and advice from the NHS website

> Chlamydia
This factsheet is for people who have chlamydia, or who would like information about it.
Information, videos and advice from the NHS website.

NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments

See the NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments browser for an in-depth description of many common health issues

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Minor Illnesses

Minor Illnesses

Every year, millions of us visit our GP with minor health problems that a local pharmacy could help with.

By visiting your pharmacy instead of your GP, you could save yourself time and trouble – no need to book an appointment, just walk in. This also means your GP can focus on treating people who are sicker than you.

Pharmacists can help recognise and treat many common illnesses. They can give advice and where appropriate, recommend over-the-counter medicines that could help clear up the problem.

If they think you need to see a GP for your illness, they will advise you to do that.

Minor Ailment Scheme

In some parts of the country, there are NHS minor ailment schemes. These allow pharmacies to provide you with medicines for free on the NHS, as well as giving you advice and support about how to care for minor conditions yourself.

The medicines covered by the scheme are different depending on where in England you live, so you will need to talk to your local pharmacy about what they offer.

Anyone who doesn’t normally have to pay for prescriptions from their GP – for example because they’re under 16, over 60 or on benefits – is eligible for the scheme and will not need to pay for the medicine that the pharmacist suggests.

Find out if you’re entitled to free NHS prescriptions.

However, if you do normally pay for your prescriptions, then you will still need to pay a prescription charge for any medicines your pharmacy recommends.

How to access the minor ailment scheme

Not all pharmacies in England are part of the minor ailments scheme so you will first have to check if your local pharmacy is part of the scheme.

You can do this by:
Click to find your local pharmacy >
Click on the pharmacy for more details,
Click on the “Departments and services” tab,
Look for “Minor ailment scheme” or “Minor ailment service” listed under “Pharmacy Service (NHS)”

To get your medicines free, you might need to bring proof that you don’t normally have to pay prescription charges. Talk to your pharmacist about what you should bring.

Your pharmacy may be able to help with:

  • mild skin conditions, such as acne, eczema, psoriasis, impetigo, athlete’s foot
  • coughs and colds, including blocked nose (nasal congestion), and sore throats
  • bruises, sunburn, and minor burns and scalds
  • constipation and piles (haemorrhoids)
  • hay fever, dry eyes and allergies (including rashes, bites and stings)
  • aches and pains, including earache, headache, migraine, back pain and toothache
  • vomiting, heartburn, indigestion, diarrhoea and threadworms
  • period pain, thrush and cystitis
  • head lice (nits)
  • conjunctivitis, cold sores and mouth ulcers
  • warts and verrucas
  • nappy rash and teething

Visiting your pharmacy about common health problems frees up time for GPs and A&E departments, which are already stretched, especially during the winter months.

Long Term Conditions

Asthma

Asthma is a common condition that causes coughing, wheezing, tightness of the chest and breathlessness. Most people with asthma who take the appropriate treatment can live normal lives, but left untreated, asthma can cause permanent damage to the airways

Symptoms of asthma

The usual symptoms of asthma are

  • coughing
  • wheezing
  • shortness of breath
  • tightness in the chest.

Not everyone will get all of these symptoms. Some people experience them from time to time; a few people may experience these symptoms all the time.

Treatment of asthma

There isn’t a cure for asthma. However, treatments are available to help manage your symptoms. Your treatment plan will be individual to you, combining medicines and asthma management in a way that works best for you.

Living with asthma

Medicines are only part of your treatment for asthma. You will also need to deal with the things that make it worse. Keep a diary to record anything that triggers your asthma – this can help you to discover a pattern. Using a peak flow meter to monitor your lung function can also help. If you have repeatedly low readings in a certain situation (for example, at the end of a working day, after exercise or after contact with an animal) this may indicate the trigger.

Useful Links

This website has been revamped to meet the needs of the thousands of people with asthma who visit the site each day, either to find important information about asthma and how to control it

Asthma
An excellent resource with useful video, audio, images and references relating to asthma.

NHS Choices – Asthma
Further information about symptoms, treatment, causes and prevention of Asthma.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Cancer

One in three people will be affected by cancer at some stage in their life. There are many different types of cancer and this page doesn’t cover them all, but the general information will help you to access further information and support.

Macmillan Cancer Support – The cancer line and how it can help

There are more videos available Macmillan and the support they offer on the Macmillan Video Site
There is further information and educational videos on the Cancer Research UK Video Site

Useful Links

Cancer – Healthtalkonline
Healthtalkonline, an award-winning charity website, lets you share in other people’s experiences of health and illness. An excellent resource compiled after interviewing a wide range of people suffering from heart disease.

Cancer Overview
An excellent resource with useful video, audio, images and references relating to differing forms of Cancer, the causes & treatments.Free information service provided by Cancer Research UK about cancer and cancer care for people with cancer and their families. Information is formatted in such a way that makes understanding the website an easy process.

Europe’s leading cancer information charity, with over 4,500 pages of up-to-date cancer information, practical advice and support for cancer patients, their families and carers.

NHS Choices
Further information about symptoms, treatment, causes and prevention of Cancer.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a preventable disease that was responsible for the deaths of 88,000 people in the UK in 2008 (British Heart Foundation CHD Statistics 2010). In all, 191,00 died from heart and circulatory disease in the UK. Death rates are highest in Scotland and North of England and lowest in the South of England. CHD is the biggest killer in the country.

There are more videos available on all aspects of BHF and heart disease on the BHF video site

Audio MP3 Downloads

Now you can download and listen to podcasts free from the BHF – either on the move or in the comfort of your own home. We have a few examples below.

Controlling Cholesterol

Giving Up Smoking

Risk Factors & Heart Disease

“The British Heart Foundation is Britain’s leading charity fighting heart and circulatory disease – the UK’s biggest killer. The BHF funds research, education and life-saving equipment and helps heart patients return to a full and active way of life. The charity relies on donations to continue its vital work.”

Home Blood Pressure Monitoring

The BHS recommends that only properly validated BP monitors be used both in the clinic and at home. All the monitors listed on their website have been clinically validated. This means that all the machines, regardless of their cost, give reliable readings when used correctly. Please note that added cost does not equate to added accuracy.

View a list of clinically validated BP monitors

Useful Links

CHD – Healthtalkonline
Healthtalkonline, an award-winning charity website, lets you share in other people’s experiences of health and illness. An excellent resource compiled after interviewing a wide range of people suffering from heart disease.

CHD
An excellent resource with useful video, audio, images and references relating to CHD.

NHS Choices
Further information about symptoms, treatment, causes and prevention of CHD.

British Heart Foundation
Our vision is of a world in which people do not die prematurely of heart disease. We will achieve this through our pioneering research, our vital prevention activity and by ensuring quality care and support for people living with heart disease.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the name for a collection of lung diseases including chronic bronchitis, emphysema and chronic obstructive airways disease. The main symptom of COPD is an inability to breathe in and out properly. This is also referred to as airflow obstruction.

What is COPD?

Useful Links

NHS Choices
Guide to the symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and risks of COPD from the NHS

COPD Factsheet
This factsheet is for people who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or who would like information about it.

British Lung Foundation
Information and guidance on living with COPD

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Diabetes

Diabetes is a long-term (chronic) condition caused by too much glucose (sugar) in the blood. It is also known as diabetes mellitus. There are two types of diabetes – type 1 and type 2.

According to the charity Diabetes UK, more than two million people in the UK have the condition and up to 750,000 more are believed to have it without realising they do.

More than three-quarters of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes mellitus. This used to be known as non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or maturity-onset diabetes mellitus. The number of people with type 2 diabetes is rapidly increasing as it commoner in the overweight and obese, which is itself a growing problem.

The remainder have type 1 diabetes mellitus, which used to be known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

What’s the treatment for diabetes?

It’s recognised that the sooner the blood sugar levels are brought under control, the better the long term prospects of preventing damage. Lifestyle advice about diet, weight management and regular activity is the first step.

Type 1 diabetes will require immediate insulin therapy, Type 2 diabetes will first be managed with a drug called Metformin, if lifestyle changes alone aren’t effective. There are now several other drugs used in type 2 diabetes, although eventually some type 2 diabetics will need insulin therapy as it’s a progressive disease

Diabetes UK – How to take a blood glucose test

There is further information and education on the Diabetes UK Video Site

Useful Links

Diabetes – Healthtalkonline
Healthtalkonline, an award-winning charity website, lets you share in other people’s experiences of health and illness. An excellent resource compiled after interviewing a wide range of people suffering from heart disease.

Type 1 Diabetes
An excellent resource with useful information and references relating to Type 1 Diabetes.

Type 2 Diabetes
A useful resource regarding Type 2 Diabetes.

Diabetes UK
Largest charity in the UK devoted to the care and treatment of people with diabetes in order to improve the quality of life for people with the condition

NHS Choices
Further information about symptoms, treatment, causes and prevention of Diabetes

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Mental Health

Mental health is about how we think, feel and behave. One in four people in the UK have a mental health problem at some point in their lives, which affects their daily life, relationships or physical health.

Mental health disorders take many different forms and affect people in different ways. Schizophrenia, depression and personality disorders are all examples of mental health problems. Diseases such as Alzheimer’s and dementia generally develop in old age, whereas eating disorders are more common in young people.

Alzheimer’s Society – Diagnosis interview with Terry Pratchett

The Alzheimer’s Society is the leading care and research charity for people with dementia and their carers.

They provide further information and education, support for carers, and quality day and home care on the Alzheimer’s Society Video Site

Mental Health Wellbeing Podcasts

You can subscribe to wellbeing podcasts on the Mental Health Foundation Website.

The website of the Mental Health Foundation outlines the charity’s work in research, policy, service development and service user involvement. The site offers information and publications to download on research, good practice in services and on mental health problems and key issues.

Useful Links

Mental Health – Healthtalkonline
Healthtalkonline, an award-winning charity website, lets you share in other people’s experiences of health and illness. An excellent resource compiled after interviewing a wide range of people suffering from heart disease.

Alzheimer’s Disease
An information sheet helping to understand mroe about Alzheimer’s Disease

Depression
An information sheet helping to understand more about the causes, treatment and understanding of Depression

Alzheimer’s Society
Comprehensive information for people with all forms of dementia. Alzheimer’s Society is a membership organisation, which works to improve the quality of life of people affected by dementia in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Alzheimer Scotland
Alzheimer Scotland provides a wide range of specialist services for people with dementia and their carers. We offer personalised support services, community activities, information and advice, at every stage of the dementia journey

Mental Health Foundation
Founded in 1949, the Mental Health Foundation is a leading UK charity that provides information, carries out research, campaigns and works to improve services for anyone affected by mental health problems, whatever their age and wherever they live

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis, affecting 8.5 million people in the UK. It develops gradually over time, causing joints to become stiff and painful. It can affect any joint but commonly affects the hands, knees, hips, feet and spine.

Osteoarthritis: a real story

Who develops osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis usually develops in people who are over 50 years of age, and it is more common in women than in men. It is commonly thought that osteoarthritis is an inevitable part of getting older, but this is not true. Younger people can also be affected by osteoarthritis, often as a result of an injury or another joint condition.

Useful Links

Arthritis Research UK
Arthritis Research UK is the charity leading the fight against arthritis. Everything we do is underpinned by research

NHS Choices
Guide to the symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and risks of Ostearthritis from the NHS

Osteoarthritis Factsheet
This factsheet is for people who have osteoarthritis or who would like information about it.

Arthritis Care
Arthritis Care exists to support people with arthritis. They are the UK’s largest organisation working with and for all people who have arthritis.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Living with Pain

The NHS website contains lots of useful information, tips and advice on living with chronic pain.

Help from your GP and use of NHS services dedicated to pain management can help make sufferers more independant, reduce the severity of pain and assist in day to day with coping with what can be a debilitating condition.

Useful Links

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Stroke

A stroke is a serious medical condition that occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is cut off.

Like all organs, the brain needs the oxygen and nutrients provided by blood to function properly. If the supply of blood is restricted or stopped, brain cells begin to die. This can lead to brain damage and possibly death.

Strokes are a medical emergency and prompt treatment is essential because the sooner a person receives treatment for a stroke, the less damage is likely to happen.

The NHS Stroke Act FAST pages offer a great deal of information about stroke, including how to recognise the signs, some real stories of stroke sufferers and advice on how to live your life after a stroke.

http://www.nhs.uk/actfast/Pages/stroke.aspx

Chest Heart & Stroke Charity (N.Ireland)

Chest Heart & Stroke Charity (Scotland)

Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)

A transient ischaemic attack (TIA), or ‘mini-stroke’, is caused by a temporary fall in the blood supply to part of the brain, leading to a lack of oxygen to the brain. This can cause symptoms that are similar to a stroke, although they don’t last as long. A TIA lasts only a few minutes and is usually resolved within 24 hours

As TIAs are serious, it is important that they are always investigated so that appropriate treatment can be given quickly. With treatment, the risk of a further TIA or a full stroke can be greatly reduced

Patient Resources

Sickness Certificates

You do not require a doctor’s sickness certificate for any illness lasting seven days or less. Your employer may however require you to complete a self-certification form (SC2) which is available for download by clicking here, from your employer or at our reception or on the HMRC website.

Evidence that you are sick

If you are sick for more than seven days, your employer can ask you to give them some form of medical evidence to support payment of SSP (statutory sick pay).

It is up to your employer to decide whether you are incapable of work. A medical certificate, now called a ‘Statement of Fitness for Work’ (see below) from your doctor is strong evidence that you are sick and would normally be accepted, unless there is evidence to prove otherwise.

You could also provide evidence from someone who is not a medical practitioner, e.g. a dentist. Your employer will decide whether or not this evidence is acceptable. If your employer has any doubts, they may still ask for a medical certificate from your GP.

Statement of Fitness for Work – ’Fit Note’

The ‘fit note’ was introduced on 6 April 2010. With your employer’s support, the note will help you return to work sooner by providing more information about the effects of your illness or injury.

For more information see the DirectGov website (where this information was sourced

Care Quality Commission

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) are the independent regulator of health and adult social care in England.

The CQC make sure health and social care services provide people with safe, effective, compassionate, high-quality care and encourage them to improve.

They monitor, inspect and regulate services to make sure they meet fundamental standards of quality and safety and publish what is found, including performance ratings to help people choose care.

Our GP Practice has recently undergone a CQC inspection and the results are now freely available on the CQC Website. You can access the report below

Dr Stockton & Dr Thompson CQC overall rating – Good

14 July 2016

See the report

Carers Direct

Are You a Carer?

If you are please let us know – we may be able to help you

There is a wealth of information on NHS Choices about carers and caring. Below are some links into the site that we hope you will find useful.

  • Caring for a parent Watch this video on: caring for a parent at home
  • Telling people Caring responsibilities can make it difficult to maintain friendships or develop new ones. Telling your friends you’re a carer is important so they understand and can support you.
  • Taking a break Caring for someone can be a full-time job, but it’s essential that you take time out for yourself too. Read our guide to accessing breaks and respite.
  • Housing and carers Do you know your tenancy rights as a carer? Are you aware of all your care at home options? Do you need tips on moving someone around the home?

Contact Carers Direct

Telephone 0808 802 0202 Helpline Information http://www.nhs.uk/carersdirect/carerslives/updates/pages/carersdirecthelpline.aspx Email [email protected] Office Hours Lines are open 8am to 9pm Monday to Friday, 11am to 4pm at weekends. Calls are free from UK landlines.

Carers support groups

Finance and Law

Help claiming benefits, looking after your bank balance and understanding the legal issues of caring.

  • Benefits for carers Directing carers to the benefits that can help them in their caring role
  • Benefits for the person you care for Advice and information on helping the person you look after get the benefits that they are entitled to
  • Death and benefits How your benefits maybe affected after the death of the person you look after and what happens to their benefits
  • Managing someone’s legal affairs Advice for when carers find they have to take over the legal affairs of the person they are looking after
  • Other benefits Advice for carers and the people they are looking after on claiming a whole host of other benefits unrelated to their disability or caring
  • Personal and household finance Advice on keeping a tight rein on household and personal finance for carers
  • Social fund
  • Tax credits Information on claiming tax credits and whether you might be eligible

Information supplied by NHS Choices

Named GP

As part of the commitment to more personalised care for patients, NHS Employers and the General Practitioners Committee of the British Medical Association have agreed that all patients will have a named accountable GP

The ‘named’ GP will: –

  • Take lead responsibility for ensuring that all appropriate services required under the contract with the practice are delivered to you
  • Where required, based on the professional judgement of the ‘named’ GP, work with relevant associated health and social care professionals to deliver a multidisciplinary care package that meets your needs
  • Ensure that your physical and psychological needs are recognised and responded to by the relevant clinicians in the practice
  • Ensure that patients over 75 years of age have access to a health check if requested, which is already a requirement of the GP contract regulations.

The Hive will ensure that there is a named accountable GP assigned to each patient.

New patients will be allocated a GP at the time of registration.

Accessible Information Standard

The Accessible Information Standard aims to make sure that disabled people have access to information that they can understand and any communication support they might need.

Further information can be obtained by reading the attached leaflet below.

Leaflet

Should you have any requirements or know of a patient who needs support please let the Practice know and we will help provide support whether that is by providing information in large print or putting a patient in touch with British Sign Language (BSL), an interpreter, email or braille.

Further information can be obtained on the NHS website www.england.nhs.uk/accessibleinfo

Charities including Action on Hearing Loss, CHANGE, Sense and the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) will also be able to provide further support.

The following Practice leaflets are available in easy read:-

Antibiotics

Blood Tests

Health Checks

ECG

Please do not hesitate to contact the Practice if you have any questions.

Rochdale health alliance

In a time of change Health and Social Care across Greater Manchester is coming together to provide more efficient, cost effective healthcare and to encourage and engage the public in managing their own care where possible. GP practices across the borough who have historically worked independently have come together to work in a federated model to improve healthcare across the borough. Retaining their own identity and autonomy GP practices will work together and support community and hospital services including the public and voluntary sector to ensure healthcare is coordinated for the residents of the borough.

Rochdale Health Alliance was established in 2016 by GP practices from across the Rochdale Borough to streamline the way in which services are delivered. Each of the 3 area’s of the borough elected GP’s to represent their locality and become directors on the board.

You can find out more here

The Directory of Services

Rochdale now have a directory of services. Providing information on health, social care, childcare and family services within the borough of Rochdale  https://www.ourrochdale.org.uk/kb5/rochdale/directory/home.page

Extra Info

"Welcome to our Practice, we are proud of our fantastic team. We welcome new patients to join our practice; come and experience healthcare as it should be"

Dr L Thompson

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